Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Indian brain behind World Maritime University (WMU) no more

Source: www.imo.org

IMO Secretary-General Emeritus Dr. C.P. Srivastava, KCMG, Secretary-General Emeritus of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), has died in Italy, aged 93.

Mr Koji Sekimizu, IMO Secretary-General, expressed his sincere condolences to the Indian Government and Dr. C.P. Srivastava’s remaining family, and also the condolences of the entire IMO membership and staff.
Dr Srivastava was born on 8 July 1920 and was educated in Lucknow, India (obtaining BA, MA and LLB degrees).
He started his career as a civil servant in the Indian Administrative Service in India, serving as the district administrator in Meerut and Lucknow, and then went on to the post of Joint Secretary to the Indian Prime Minister's office of the late Lal Bahadur Shastri from 1964 to1966.
”It is with great sadness that we have learned of the passing of Dr. C.P. Srivastava, the longest-serving Secretary-General of the Organization,” Mr. Sekimizu said in a statement released to media.
”Dr. C.P. Srivastava was a truly great Secretary-General who established the World Maritime University and placed IMO's work on technical co-operation in a central position in the work of the Organization, in order to promote the implementation of IMO conventions on a  truly global scale,” he said.
During Dr. Srivastava’s tenure as Secretary-General, from 1974 until his retirement on 31 December 1989, IMO increased its membership considerably.
Dr. Srivastava was well known for his relentless efforts to make IMO known to the developing world and for encouraging developing countries to join the “rich men’s club”, as IMO was often referred to at the time. This shaped the structure of the Organization’s membership to its present status, whereby two-thirds of the 170-strong membership (and three Associate Members) is represented by developing countries, making a significant contribution to IMO.

Dr. Srivastava’s leadership of IMO is associated with the success of the 1978 Tanker Safety and Pollution Prevention (TSPP) Conference, and the development and adoption of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), 1978, the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR), 1979, the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (SUA), 1988, and related Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Fixed Platforms located on the Continental Shelf, and many other treaties and Codes.
Dr. Srivastava will be remembered for his visionary and pioneering role and his ceaseless efforts in the establishment of IMO’s global educational institutions, including the World Maritime University (WMU), in Malmö, Sweden, and the International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI), in Malta.

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